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Find the Biggest Bulls in Your Area

In The Hunt by Chuck AdamsLeave a Comment

In 2003, I had the good fortune to kill a Montana bull with a net score of nearly 400. A cow elk had leaped up in front of me and right behind her was a monster bull with the biggest back forks I had ever seen. As he jumped a log and ducked around a tree, I could see six long points on each side, main beams that stretched to his rump, and an impossibly …

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Should I Fly or Drive To My Next Hunt?

In The Hunt by RMEFLeave a Comment

Last bow season, I found myself on an airplane next to a hunter from Florida who was heading to Colorado to chase elk. He asked me point blank, “If I shoot a monster bull, how can I get the antlers home?” I didn’t know, but I told him we’d figure it out.  First off, does it make sense to take to the skies for your next elk hunt? Not really, says veteran elk hunter Wayne …

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Off-season? What off-season?

In Bugle, The Hunt by Chuck Adams1 Comment

Reddish brown hair flickered between two trees, and I slowly drew my arrow. A split-instant later, the critter stepped into view 25 yards away. I aimed, dumped the bowstring and heard the broadhead strike like a fist against a melon—a perfect, quick-killing hit! Similar scenarios occur hundreds of times each fall as bowhunters across the country call in elk. But the month of the hunt just described was February, and the animal was a big, …

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Understanding Rifle Recoil

In Bugle, Gear 101, The Hunt by Wayne van ZwollLeave a Comment

Bullet launch is a violent event. The sudden expansion of powder gas that boots a snug-fitting bullet from zero to 3,000 feet per second (2,045 mph) moves the rifle, too. You’re the brake. You absorb the recoil. No matter how big or tough you think you are, you will react to punishing recoil. Flinching moves your rifle before bullet release, so it affects point of impact. Sir Isaac Newton described recoil when he determined that …

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Tips on Selecting an Outfitter

In The Hunt by Jim ZumboLeave a Comment

Ask for references and call them. Then, ask for names and contact info of other hunters who were in camp and call them too. The outfitter will likely supply you only with happy hunters who might be the exceptions. Be sure you and the outfitter are on the same page regarding availability of animals, as well as the chances of seeing a trophy – if that’s what you’re after. Be sure he understands what you’re …

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How to Bone Out a Hindquarter in the Field

In The Hunt by RMEFLeave a Comment

When packing out an elk on your back, you need to make every load count. While leaving bones in the quarters might make handling and hanging easier, it does you no favors as you hike back to the truck. A mature bull weighs roughly 400 pounds, field dressed. Roughly 200 pounds of that is head, hide and bone. A good way to ditch 30 pounds or more is to bone out an elk’s hindquarter. Here’s how you do it.

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Hang Your Meat

In The Hunt by PJ DelHommeLeave a Comment

My favorite way to hang a cross-pole is to use two trees with thick lower branches. After finding trees 10-15 feet apart, limb a 5- to 6-inch diameter pole to use as the crossbeam. With or without helpers, it’s fairly easy to set the first end on a branch next to the trunk 8 or 10 feet up. You can loosely lash it to the branches or just rest it there. Keep in mind the …

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Hunt Elk the Whitetail Way

In The Hunt by RMEF4 Comments

Bowhunting elk the whitetail way may sound like a disappointment due to the lack of interaction, activity and simply seeing the country, but oftentimes it’s the best strategy. Locating a frequently visited waterhole, wallow, food source or the trail in between can lead to ample ambush opportunities. And despite the randomness of elk, they do pattern. The patterns may be more subtle than that of whitetails, but with dedicated scouting patterns emerge. There are three …

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Randy Newberg’s “SYSTEM” for finding Late Season Bulls

In Randy Newberg - Hunter, The Hunt by RMEF19 Comments

Hunting elk with Randy Newberg during the Post-Rut. This ELK TALK video describes the most predictable time period for elk behavior. Old bulls know it is time to find sanctuary. Survival is dependent upon finding these sanctuaries where hunters don’t want to go. Survival is also the second need, the third need, the fourth……. Find security with a little food nearby and you’ve found a place Late Season bulls will like. Late Season is when …

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There Is No Off-Season

In The Hunt by RMEFLeave a Comment

No elk this year? Maybe it’s time to start making amends. Winter. It’s a time to unwind in front of the fireplace, reflect on past hunts and watch gridiron play-offs on the tele. Screech … Hold on! Winter may be a time to relax after a strenuous and possibly trying hunting season, but it’s no time to turn your back on the hunt. Quite the contrary. For a successful season next fall and to help …

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The Art of Trailcraft

In The Hunt by Ben Long3 Comments

The opportunity came suddenly. I had maneuvered a maze of Doug fir downfall and encountered a raghorn bull. The shot must have been within 50 yards because I could not see much farther than that in the dark timber. At the shot, the bull vanished like the smoke from the muzzle of my .30-06. On hands and knees, I studied the beargrass and whortleberry. The only sign I could find in the dry, hard ground …

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What Use is an Elk Antler?

In The Hunt by RMEF2 Comments

Ah … spring. What a great time to get outside, minus, of course, the mud caked to your dog’s belly and the ticks cruising their way to your nether regions. Even so, there should be no excuses not to search the elk hills for shed antlers.
Let’s say you find an antler. Now what? Well, we asked our members via Facebook, “What good is an elk antler?” And they responded. Below are 50 of our favorite ways to use your prized finds.

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Hindquarter Break-Down

In Bugle, The Hunt by RMEF21 Comments

Once boned out, there is a giant pile of meat waiting to be unfolded. Begin separating the muscles by following the natural lines of the connective tissue. If you’re new to this, begin on the outside of the quarter as the muscles are easier to see. When it’s over you should have roughly six slabs of muscle. Some or all of these can be cut into steaks but others such as bottom round and eye …