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E-Scouting for Elk with Randy Newberg and onX (Part 9)

In Randy Newberg - Hunter, The Hunt by RMEFLeave a Comment

In Episode #9 of E-Scouting for elk, Randy Newberg goes through the entire process of creating an E-scouting plan for a pre-rut elk hunt. Randy shows how all the information in prior videos comes together for building this E-scouting plan. Using information explained those prior videos, Randy explains why he is looking for food and water as the primary need, given this is a pre-rut hunt. Randy picks general locations, how he ranks them, and …

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The Gutless Gutting Method

In The Hunt by RMEFLeave a Comment

Our friends over at Eastman’s Hunting Journals have put together a great compilation working through the Gutless Method for Big Game Animals.

The series of videos walks through removing the backstrap, removing the tenderloins, de-boning the hind quarters, de-boning the front quarters, caping an elk, and removing the head using only a knife!

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How To Master Elk Bugles

In Pursue the Wild, The Hunt by RMEFLeave a Comment

Learning to replicate elk sounds and having a comprehensive understanding of what elk sounds mean, will help increase your success in the field. Having the ability to create a wide variety of elk sounds your calling can literally set the tone for how the elk react around you. Just because you have not heard bulls fired up and bugling with the frenzy of the rut does not mean that you can’t tell the “story” of …

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Find the Biggest Bulls in Your Area

In The Hunt by Chuck AdamsLeave a Comment

In 2003, I had the good fortune to kill a Montana bull with a net score of nearly 400. A cow elk had leaped up in front of me and right behind her was a monster bull with the biggest back forks I had ever seen. As he jumped a log and ducked around a tree, I could see six long points on each side, main beams that stretched to his rump, and an impossibly …

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Blood-trailing Elk 101

In The Hunt by Chuck AdamsLeave a Comment

1) Use a powerful setup, large broadhead, and make a broadside shot 2) Arrow-hit elk often walk or run uphill before they drop 3) Flag the spot where you shot, and then any drops of blood 4) Follow to one side of the blood trail 5) Trail slowly A sharp, well-directed arrow is deadly on elk. But that arrow is worthless if you can’t recover the animal after the hit.  Elk recovery can be as …