View Post

How To Effectively Use Binoculars and Tripods with Randy Newberg

In Gear 101, Randy Newberg - Hunter by RMEFLeave a Comment

In this video Randy Newberg explains how he uses a tripod for his binoculars, in this case Leupold binoculars of either a 15x or 10x magnification. Using a tripod stabilizes your image, causes you to slow down, and allows you to examine the entire field of view before moving your optics. Always glass the close areas first, then moving to areas further away. Gridding is essential to make sure you don’t overlook any part of …

View Post

Knife 101

In Gear 101 by RMEFLeave a Comment

I spent one fall semester slinging carcasses at a meat processor in Bozeman, Montana. After a couple of 10-hour days with a cheap, dull knife, I found a long-forgotten high-quality blade tucked behind some boots on the shelf. Devoting a lunch-hour to honing its edge, I gave it new life, and it made my tasks infinitely easier. Every night, I hid that knife in the same spot. The right knife will make gutting and cutting …

View Post

Getting the Most of Field Rests

In Gear 101 by Wayne van ZwollLeave a Comment

There’s a proper technique to using a rest. I’m really good at using back rests—even a cave man can do that. But supporting the rifle with a rest isn’t as easy as it looks. Benchrest shooters, who fire match ammo through heavy, accurate rifles over sophisticated rests, are very conscious of technique. Even if the rest is solid, your shoulder can nudge the rifle at the instant of firing. Your trigger pull can tug it …

View Post

20 Reasons You Need Paracord On your Next Hunt

In Gear 101 by RMEFLeave a Comment

Like duct tape, parachute cord has risen to “never leave elk camp without it” status in recent years. And for good reason. As the name suggests, the cord was originally used to connect paratroopers to their parachutes during World War II. The job called for a lightweight but incredibly strong elastic cord. After the war, military surplus stores carried it, but it stayed relatively unknown except to hunters and hikers. Now, with the general public …

View Post

Build Your Own Ghillie Suit

In Gear 101, The Hunt by Justin KarnoppLeave a Comment

The Ghillie suit is named for the old Scottish game wardens, or “Ghillies”, who first realized that by adding loose strips of cloth or twine to their clothing, they could create a three-dimensional breakup of their outline and remain undetectedin the wide-open highlands. The Ghillie suit has been the preferred camouflage of military snipers for open terrain, and many hunters are now adding one to their wardrobe for spot-and-stalk missions in terrain void of natural …